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Itch: eog core dump on Galaxy 7 panorama image
Jun 10th, 2019 by miki

  • Took some photos with my Galaxy 7. Some were panoramas.
  • EOG crashed while loading them.
  • Memory was low.
  • Maybe related to previously experienced missing EOI marker issue with Samsung camera application.

Will investigate later and amend the post (promise!).

Commandline Dump

$ free; find . -size +25M -exec bash -c 'ls -l {}; eog {}; echo' \;; free
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:        7746692     5767656      843228      317764     1135808     1271048
Swap:       7950332     5113012     2837320
-rw-rw-r-- 1 miki miki 39926496 Jun 10 19:25 ./20190609_184124.jpg

** (eog:23320): CRITICAL **: eog_reload_plugin_activate: assertion 'G_IS_MENU (model)' failed
eog: ../../../../src/cairo-xlib-surface-shm.c:619: _cairo_xlib_shm_pool_create: Assertion `*ptr != ((void *)0)' failed.
bash: line 1: 23320 Aborted                 (core dumped) eog ./20190609_184124.jpg

-rw-rw-r-- 1 miki miki 38286099 Jun 10 19:26 ./20190609_183714.jpg

** (eog:23332): CRITICAL **: eog_reload_plugin_activate: assertion 'G_IS_MENU (model)' failed
eog: ../../../../src/cairo-xlib-surface-shm.c:619: _cairo_xlib_shm_pool_create: Assertion `*ptr != ((void *)0)' failed.
bash: line 1: 23332 Aborted                 (core dumped) eog ./20190609_183714.jpg

-rw-rw-r-- 1 miki miki 36181801 Jun  9 17:13 ./20190609_160437.jpg

** (eog:23343): CRITICAL **: eog_reload_plugin_activate: assertion 'G_IS_MENU (model)' failed

** (eog:23343): CRITICAL **: eog_reload_plugin_deactivate: assertion 'G_IS_MENU (menu)' failed

-rw-rw-r-- 1 miki miki 39059177 Jun 10 19:25 ./20190609_184146.jpg

** (eog:23354): CRITICAL **: eog_reload_plugin_activate: assertion 'G_IS_MENU (model)' failed
eog: ../../../../src/cairo-xlib-surface-shm.c:619: _cairo_xlib_shm_pool_create: Assertion `*ptr != ((void *)0)' failed.
bash: line 1: 23354 Aborted                 (core dumped) eog ./20190609_184146.jpg

              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:        7746692     5773448      495604      659944     1477640      922956
Swap:       7950332     5112700     2837632
$ 

 

Bookmarklet to view OSM from coordinates parsed from URL
Aug 12th, 2016 by miki

Here’s a quick Javascript bookmarklet I threw together for opening a new browser window showing an area in OpenStreetMap that is defined from extracting the current window’s URL and searching after useable values for latitude, longitude and zoom.

It grew out of an annoyance over Mapillary’s rendering of the Danish endpoint of the under construction HVDC Cobra Cable(more about it from 4C, even more from EnergiNet and the EU) in Endrup nearby where I live.

In Mapillary’s tiles rendering it is just a bunch of roads and a single POI indication. Whereas the Mapnik rendering shows the existing power infrastructure and the area under construction.

Cobra HVDC, Endrup, Mapillary vs. OpenStreetMap

Well, I have been subjecting my oldstyle C brain to some Javascript lately so I decided to use that haemorrhage for attempting to put together a bookmarklet extracting coordinates from the current window’s URL and opening a new with the same approximate location in OSM.

It ended up like the below code block, and should also be usable on any other sites which receives locations via URL (both using HTTP GET notation with ‘?’ and locally in the page using anchors with ‘#’) and identifying them with key-value pairs using common names ({z,zoom},{lat},{lng,lon}). Note that this doesn’t include OpenStreetMap itself neither Google Maps as they only use the lat/lon values.

javascript:(function (){params={};kvs=document.location.href.split('&');kvs.forEach(function(kv){if(kv.indexOf('?'))kv=kv.substr(kv.indexOf('?')+1);if(kv.indexOf('#'))kv=kv.substr(kv.indexOf('#')+1);skv=kv.split('=');params[skv[0]]=skv[1];});window.open('http://openstreetmap.org/#map='+(params.z?params.z:13)+'/'+(params.lat?params.lat:55.5)+'/'+(params.lng?params.lng:(params.lon?params.lon:8.5)));console.log(params);})();

Copy and paste the above into the “Location” or “URL” of a bookmark and you’ll be able to click it to open a new OSM window on, at least for Mapillary maps pages, the same location as the original site. If nothing is found it will default to coordinates of my hometown of Esbjerg at 55.5/.8.5.

Here’s a prettified edition of the code:

params={};
kvs=document.location.href.split('&');
kvs.forEach(function(kv){
  if(kv.indexOf('?'))
    kv=kv.substr(kv.indexOf('?')+1);
  if(kv.indexOf('#'))
    kv=kv.substr(kv.indexOf('#')+1);
  skv=kv.split('=');
  params[skv[0]]=skv[1];
});
window.open( 'http://openstreetmap.org/#map='
            +(params.z?params.z:(params.zoom?params.zoom:13))+'/'
            +(params.lat?params.lat:55.5)+'/'
            +(params.lng?params.lng:(params.lon?params.lon:8.5))
           );
console.log(params);

Possible TODOs

  • get rid of default location, warn instead
  • support and test more sites (gmaps/osm!)
  • scan page contents for other geo markers
What’s with the P in ATmega328P? (breakdown of ATmega chip naming system)
Nov 24th, 2015 by miki

Having used the Arduino prototyping platform (a loose combination of specific pieces of somewhat open/free hardware and a more open/free software stack) for some time for educational and tinkering purposes in my local hackerspace (geeklabs.dk) I have seen and studied the Arduino UNO hardware and lots of its “clones/compatibles/knockoffs” and their common MCU (MicroController Unit);

Atmel ATmega328P

I had begun wondering what the P in the microcontroller model name actually meant. So here is an attempt to decode the Atmel megaAVR chip numbering system. The other existing AVR based series UC3, tinyAVR, XMEGA, Battery & Automotive, will probably employ similar naming schemes.

The remainder of the product name following “ATmega” expresses the available flash memory and the approximate pin count of the package in an integer and optionally other features as either integer or letter (like the initial wondering of P in 328P above).

Starting with the integer, it is a concatenation of two separate integers encoding the flash size and pin count as defined below. The division of the two is non-ambiguous leaving some interpretation to be done.

1st integer: onboard flash size
8 = 4 KiB
8 = 8 KiB
16 = 16 KiB
32 = 32 KiB
64 = 64 KiB
128 = 128 KiB
256 = 256 KiB

2nd integer: total pin number
(none) = standard pin count (differs)
8=28/32-pin
4= 40/44/49-pin
5= 64-pin
0= 100-pin

Suffix (char or integer), multiple possible
P = picoPower (max. consumption 9mA@8MHz,5v vs. 12mA@8Mhz,5v for non-P)
9=LCD controller
U2 = USB controller
U4 = USB controller
A  = ?

Exceptions
Note that some of the product names are completely void of these rules. Others employ different numbering but still with a familiarity to the above.

An example:
ATmega6490A: 64KB flash, 100-pin, LCD Controller

Sources

»  Substance:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa
© 2020 Mikkel Kirkgaard Nielsen, contents CC BY-SA 4.0